What makes one salesperson better than another?

Quite frankly I am tired of the same old preaching’s of
“micro-sales” techniques intended to enhance sales
“efficiency”.

There is little discussion on what I would call the
“effectiveness” of sales: the ability of a salesperson to
consistently win over the competition; to be chosen every time out.

It’s not good enough to be merely competent at your
craft; you need to be the ONLY one
that does what you do.

Many technically competent individuals don’t make it because
they are indistinguishable from the sales herd.

More than sales competency is needed. If you can’t answer
the question “Why should I buy from you and not the other guys?” you’re
like everyone else: indistinguishable, invisible, unremarkable and boring – and
your sales record will be marginal at best.

These 7 tactics will make you DiFFERENT and memorable.

1. Take
a long term view; don’t try to exploit the moment.
 Pay
attention to your quarterly targets, but have a long term context to govern the
way you treat your clients. Purely focusing on your quarterly numbers will
likely force you at some point to place too much emphasis on your products and
not your client’s needs. This short term focus builds neither trust nor
loyalty. Take a long term view and behave accordingly.

2. Make
the sales process a memorable experience. 
Make your client feel
heard, listened to and engaged; avoid using the conversation to feed your ego.
A strong unbridled ego generally results in a one-way “transmit
mode” conversation with a client. It’s a one-way embellishment of the
salesperson, their products and organization with no regard for the client’s wants
and needs. Many sales people get sucked in to this; avoid it like the plague.

3. Build relationships;
don’t jam products down your client’s throat. 
The end game is a deep
meaningful trusting relationship that will spawn revenue for several
years. Flogging products to
take a defensive position; it takes away from
building relationships.

4. Ask
questions. 
The prime directive is to understand client secrets and
desires that no one else knows. The only way you get there is by gently probing
and taking notes of whatever you learn. No act shows that you care
about what they say than note-taking.

5. Respect silence. Give
your client the opportunity to think about the points raised in the
conversation and thoughtfully respond without having to compete with your
“verbal incoming”. Too much information is not a good thing; if they
feel like they are drinking through a fire hose, they will shut down.

6. Honour integrity and honesty. Don’t
do whatever it takes to make the sale. And if a sale isn’t in the
cards, find another solution to
your client’s problem even if it involves another provider. Protect the client
relationship regardless of the personal short term outcome.

7. Be a passionate
advocate for your client inside your company. 
There is nothing
worse for any client than having to battle your internal bureaucracy when they
have an issue or they need help. Wage battle for them on your
“inside”. Absorb the body blows your organization has to offer.
Establish your currency as a recovery addict and
do whatever it takes to fix mistakes and correct errors to the delight of your
client. Learn what it’s like doing business with your company. Maybe you
can help improve it.

How
do you know if you are heading in the right direction?

Ask
your client if you touched their heart.

 

Roy Osing (@royosing) is a former CMO with over 33 years of leadership experience covering all the major business functions including business strategy, marketing, sales, customer service and people development. He is a blogger, educator, coach, adviser and the author of the book series Be Different or Be Dead.

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